Leibniz Institute of European History

The Leibniz Institute of European History (IEG) in Mainz is an independent research institute. Its purpose is to conduct academic research on European history. The Institute fulfils this purpose through the individual and joint research efforts of its staff and through the research scholarships and fellowships that it awards to academics both from Germany and abroad.

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In 2024, it started its new IEG Research Agenda: “Society”, “religion” together with “digitality” – and, in perspective, “environment” – will form the principal foci of the IEG’s research. The connection between these areas is maintained above all by the Europe Forum. Historical research on Europe in its cross-border and global interdependencies thus captures key processes that have had an impact in the past and continue to do so today. With a view to questions of social cohesion, religious plurality, climate change and digital transformation, they bring the insights of rigorous historical scholarship to bear on European options for action and their limits as well as suggesting alternative paths.
The research projects at the IEG jointly illuminate enduring issues from a long-term perspective. They deal with changes, ruptures and continuities and address memory and the use to which pasts are put. They are organised on a European basis, taking into account relationships and taking a comparative view of interactions on a local, regional, national, international and global level. By incorporating digital processes, historical methods are continuously expanded and conceptually developed. Scholars working at the IEG draw on their projects to contribute to the fields of society, religion and digitality. They also participate in the overarching activities and debates in the Europe Forum.


Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe

The Herder Institute supports a wide range of scientific activities on the historical and cultural development of East Central Europe through its research, knowledge transfer, documentation and digitalization departments. The focus of interest is on Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia as well as the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad. An important concern is the joint exploration of the interrelation of this core region with its neighbors (above all Germany, Austria, Hungary, Ukraine, Belarus and Russia) in a comparative pan-European context. For several years now, the Digital Humanities have been a major focus of the institute’s work, both in the area of digital and social infrastructure development as well as in research and career development.

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The unique collections consist of a research library on the history and culture of East Central Europe, which now contains more than half a million media units, including a music collection, a samizdat collection and a press collection. Daily and weekly newspapers from East Central Europe have been archived since 1952 and have been evaluated for the period up to 1999 in a systematic collection of more than 5 million clippings. In addition, the Institute also has one of the best image archives with image carriers of all kinds, especially on the art and cultural history of East Central Europe (currently about 700,000 units), a map collection with about 45,000 map sheets, about 1,200 old maps and slightly more than 6,300 aerial photographs from the years between 1942 and 1945. Finally, the document collection focuses on the history of the Baltic
States and continuously collects estates, family archives, individual archival documents as well as photographed archival records (about 1,300 running meters of shelving). The materials held in stock are the starting point for our own research, close cooperation with the two universities in Giessen and Marburg in research and teaching, and close networking with numerous other Leibniz institutions (Leibniz Research Associations).

Current project-leading perspectives

Collecting, preserving, indexing and communicating
Visual history and art history
Reflection and design of digital change
Space – City – Environment
Political orders – conflict – security

Peace Research Institute Frankfurt

The Peace Research Institute Frankfurt is one of Europe’s leading peace and conflict research institutes, and the largest of its kind in Germany. We analyze the causes and patterns of conflict from the global to the local level, attempts to build and sustain peace,
and make practical recommendations on peace and conflict-related issues. We combine basic research with knowledge transfer for policy, the media, and society. To achieve this mission and as a member of the Leibniz Association, we are funded by the German federal government, the state of Hesse, and the city of Frankfurt, and also receive third-party funds.

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PRIF has built up an extensive body of knowledge on key aspects that are critical to the state and future of peace in the world. These topics, which we continuously address, include: arms control and disarmament; international norms, regimes, and organizations; armed conflict and organized violence; military and nonmilitary interventions; peacebuilding and democratization; as well as nonviolent social conflict and societal peace. These topics are investigated in PRIF’s five Research Departments (RD), which are the main research units of the institute. They represent key research fields in peace and conflict studies, dealing with questions of international security (RD I), the role of international institutions (RD II), transnational politics (RD III), peace and conflict at the intrastate level (RD IV), as well as the interaction between political globalization and local lifeworlds (RD V).

The Research Departments also host smaller Research Groups. These groups pool the expertise and coordinate research on a specific topic. Currently, Research Groups deal with emerging technologies as well as biological and chemical weapons (RD I), public international law (RD II), terrorism and radicalization (RD III), regime competition (RD IV) and African intervention politics (RD V). In contrast to the RDs, which are the key administrative research units at PRIF, these groups are smaller and more flexible – they can be established, adjusted and dissolved more easily. While embedded in individual RDs, the groups can also include members from other departments. In addition, Research Groups and individual researchers can join forces in what we call cross-cutting research areas, which address ongoing political developments and academic debates, and facilitate collaboration across the Research Departments as well as with our national and international partners.

PRIF emphasizes the dissemination of practically relevant findings to society at large. As part of our knowledge transfer strategy, we provide background information on current events and analysis for ministries, parties, NGOs, and corporations. We conceive knowledge transfer as a dialogical exchange between science and society, which also engages with ideas and inspiration from society and integrates these into scientific work.

Science and Research Centre Koper – A Hub of Mediterranean Wisdom

The Science and Research Centre Koper (ZRS Koper) works on an interdisciplinary basis, involving humanities, social and natural sciences, with special emphasis given to the research in the specific environments of the Mediterranean and the upper Adriatic region.

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The main activities are:
– basic and applied research, production of professional expertise and counseling, education, organisation of scientific meetings, publishing and editorial activities, librarianship .

ZRS Koper is actively integrating in international scientific cooperation and is connecting with many similar organisations worldwide.

Researchers are also actively involved in academic process at all three Slovene public universities, thus ensuring the transfer of research results into the educational sphere.

History of ZRS Koper
The Science and Research Centre of the Republic of Slovenia, Koper (ZRS Koper) was founded on the 1st December 1994 by the Government of the Republic of Slovenia as well as the community of coastal municipalities (as legal successor of all three coastal municipalities: Koper City Municipality, Izola Municipality and Piran Municipality) and the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts.
During the years 2003 to 2015 ZRS Koper acted as a member of the University of Primorska and was it’s main research hub. Nine ZRS Koper institutes carried out an enviable job, many internationally recognized researchers have enabled the transfer of knowledge to dozens of study programs.
Aiming for responsible design of its own future, the ZRS Koper researchers strive for a new form of organization. Following the decision of the Government of the Republic of Slovenia, a public research institute, the Science and Research Centre Koper was established on 26 November 2016.

Institut d’Études Européennes

For 60 years, the Institut d’études européennes of the Université libre de Bruxelles (IEE-ULB) has been at the forefront of the study of the European institutions and the evolutions of European integration. The interdisciplinary research at the IEE-ULB is based on the contributions of researchers and academics representing 13 disciplinary research centres and units from across 5 Faculties: the Faculty of Philosophy and Social Sciences; the Faculty of Law and Criminology; the Faculty of Arts, Translation, and Communication; the Faculty of Psychology, Education Sciences and Speech Therapy; and Solvay Brussels School of Economics & Management.

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As a scientific platform at the crossroads of several departmental research centres, the IEE conducts, coordinates, promotes, facilitates and publicizes specific interdisciplinary activities on European issues. Overall, understanding the institutions, policies and dynamics of integration associated with the EU requires considering them in the context of globalization. This has seen the IEE’s approach evolve into a so-called concentric one. This concentric research agenda is organized along four transversal research themes grouping researchers from all of the aforementioned disciplines:

• Europe as an area of freedom, security and justice – Since the entry into force of the Treaty of Amsterdam, the maintenance and development of an Area of Freedom, Security and Justice has been one of the European Union’s objectives. The IEE-ULB’s first crosscutting area of research is devoted to studying this objective.
• Europe as an area of economic and social regulation – The IEE-ULB’s second area of research addresses European policy-making by dealing with the most important areas in view of an understanding of European integration: economic governance, territories and regional policy, common market and social issues.
• Europe as a community of norms and values – The IEE-ULB’s third crosscutting area of research focusses on cooperation processes, processes of identification and conflict generated by European integration and their role in the legitimization of the EU as a political entity.
• Europe in the world – The IEE-ULB ‘Europe in the World’ crosscutting area of research examines the European Union in terms of global governance; i.e. the interactions between global policy and European policies.

WZB Berlin Social Science Center

The WZB Berlin Social Science Center conducts basic research on problems of modern societies in a globalized world. The research is theory-based, problem-oriented, often long-term, and mostly based on international comparisons. Around 200 scientists from various disciplines work together at the WZB, mainly from sociology, political science, economics, and law. Our research areas are dynamics of social inequalities, society, and economic dynamics, international politics and law, dynamics of political systems, migration and diversity, and political economy of development.

MIGLOBA- The network on migration and global mobility of the University of Antwerp

The Herder Institute supports a wide range of scientific activities on the historical and cultural development of East Central Europe through its research, knowledge transfer, documentation and digitalization departments. The focus of interest is on Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia as well as the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad. An important concern is the joint exploration of the interrelation of this core region with its neighbors (above all Germany, Austria, Hungary, Ukraine, Belarus and Russia) in a comparative pan-European context. For several years now, the Digital Humanities have been a major focus of the institute’s work, both in the area of digital and social infrastructure development as well as in research and career development.

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The unique collections consist of a research library on the history and culture of East Central Europe, which now contains more than half a million media units, including a music collection, a samizdat collection and a press collection. Daily and weekly newspapers from East Central Europe have been archived since 1952 and have been evaluated for the period up to 1999 in a systematic collection of more than 5 million clippings. In addition, the Institute also has one of the best image archives with image carriers of all kinds, especially on the art and cultural history of East Central Europe (currently about 700,000 units), a map collection with about 45,000 map sheets, about 1,200 old maps and slightly more than 6,300 aerial photographs from the years between 1942 and 1945. Finally, the document collection focuses on the history of the Baltic
States and continuously collects estates, family archives, individual archival documents as well as photographed archival records (about 1,300 running meters of shelving). The materials held in stock are the starting point for our own research, close cooperation with the two universities in Giessen and Marburg in research and teaching, and close networking with numerous other Leibniz institutions (Leibniz Research Associations).

Current project-leading perspectives

Collecting, preserving, indexing and communicating
Visual history and art history
Reflection and design of digital change
Space – City – Environment
Political orders – conflict – security

Architectural Culture of the Early Modern Eastern Adriatic

The project AdriArchCult is a part of the ERC funding scheme. It is the first large-scale project examining the Early Modern Eastern Adriatic architectural culture from the comparative perspective focusing on four research domains: territorialisation, religious sphere, peripatetic of knowledge on architecture and architectural practice.

Globalized Memorial Museums. Exhibiting Atrocities in the Era of Claims for Moral Universals

The five-year project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) and is headed by Ljiljana Radonić. The ‘universalization of the Holocaust’ has established the Shoah as a historical reference point legitimizing a global moral imperative to respect human rights. Much has been written about the ostensible ‘globalization of memory’, but as yet no genuinely global comparative study systematically confronting this hypothesis with the actual representations of atrocities exists.

GMM examines 50 memorial museums dealing with the WWII period in the US, Israel, Europe, China, and Japan; recent genocides in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Scholars claim that ‘globalized’ memorial museums reflect new moral standards and a new language of commemoration, but what is the price of the attendant decontextualization in the name of moral universals? This first global typology of memorial museums challenges the concept of ‘universal memory’ and the notion that memorial museums constitute a globalized space of communication and negotiation. [The project ends in August 2024, but Ljiljana Radonic will continue working on this topic also after the project runtime.]

Peace Research Institute Oslo – PRIO

The Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) conducts research on the conditions for peaceful relations between states, groups and people. Research excellence lies at the heart of the institute’s identity.

PRIO hosts six projects funded by the European Research Council (ERC), awarded with scientific excellence as the sole criterion. It has a higher number of such grants per researcher than any other host institution in Norway. PRIO’s ERC projects examine specific aspects of armed conflict, development, migration, and climate change. All engage with theoretically or methodologically challenging dimensions of time: understanding the past, anticipating the future, or disentangling social transformations.

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– ANTICIPATE: Anticipating the impact of armed conflict on human development (ERC Advanced Grant, 2022-2027), led by Håvard Hegre

The interdisciplinary team of ANTICIPATE studies how armed conflict impacts various aspects of human development, taking local vulnerabilities into account, and expands the VIEWS early-warning system to also alert to the humanitarian impact of war.

– AWAR: Adapted to War (ERC Starting Grant, 2021-2026), led by Henrikas Bartusevičius

Was war a common feature of life during human evolution? To address this question AWAR draws on multiple disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive science, and psychology, and conducts online psychophysiological experiments in 40 countries.

– FUMI: Future Migration as Present Fact (ERC Consolidator Grant, 2018-2025), led by Jørgen Carling

FUMI addresses the research question How does migration that has not yet taken place shape the lives of individuals and the development of societies? The project is based on multiple forms of data collection among young adults in three West African cities.

– MigrationRhythms: Migration rhythms in trajectories of upward social mobility in Asia (ERC Starting Grant, 2021-2026), led by Marta Bivand Erdal

What is driving the tremendous middle-class expansion in Asia and how is it related to the unprecedented levels of migration there? To answer this, the project applies rhythmanalysis and uses a mixed-methods research design, including family history interviews and survey data from four Asian cities.

– POLIMPACT: Enabling politically sensitive climate change impact assessments for the 21st century (ERC Advanced Grant, 2022-2027), led by Halvard Buhaug

Scenarios used by the IPCC to assess climate change impacts by design assume that there will be no conflict or instability in the future. POLIMPACT will develop and use new political scenarios and thus foster more realistic risk assessments.

– ViEWS PoC: Violence Early-Warning System (ERC Proof of Concept Grant, 2022-2024), led by Håvard Hegre

This PoC allows the political Violence Early-Warning System (ViEWS) research group to explore the societal potential of their work.